Category Archives: armchair slipcovers

How-To Create a Fitted Slipcover for a Cushy Curvy Chair

Club Chair Custom Slipcover Natural Denim

A rounded back, curved inner back, puffy rolled top and deep tufts. These cozy features on Roxanne’s well-loved arm chair have stood the test time.

Her old chair is still sturdy and very comfortable. Never mind the faded, outdated upholstery. When a chair has good bones, comfy support and classic design the sky’s the limit on updating the look.

Roxanne’s vision for her chair:  clean, bright and versatile. She went with a fitted slipcover in natural denim.

Fitted? How in the world do you get fabric to snug smoothly over all of those cushy curves? Continue reading

Why I Cut Up This Brand New Pottery Barn Slipcover

Slipcover Replicate of Pottery Barn Comfort Rolled ArmchairI copy a lot of old slipcovers. They come to me thread bare, stained, shrunk and stretched. That’s the norm for a worn & loved slipcover.

Most well-used covers are in such bad shape they are ready to be thrown out. For that reason, I’m never hesitant about cutting them apart to use as a template.

But this project was different. My customer, Nicholas, sent me his brand new a Pottery Barn Comfort Rolled Armchair slipcover to duplicate. Yes, brand new! It was was perfect in every way. Well, almost perfect. Continue reading

A Cotton Ticking That Works for Washable Slipcovers

Navy Natural Ticking Slipcover

For Malorie & Mike’s slipcover makeover I updated their pair of Wesley Hall faded velveteen chairs and ottoman using medium weight Covington New Woven Ticking.

Yes, you read that right — a medium weight ticking as in 7  to 8 ounces. Gasp!

If you’ve been following my blog for awhile you know I rarely recommend ticking, or any other fabric, that is lighter in weight than 10 ounces. Why? Most medium weight fabrics lack the coverage and durability that an everyday slipcover requires.

At first I was reluctant to use Covington’s 7.8 oz cotton ticking to cover plush upholstery. It’s not the heavy weight I prefer. I’m still on the search for that. But it worked surprisingly well for my customer’s project because it has four things going for it:

Continue reading