Category Archives: slipcover tutorials

DIY Cushion Refresh for Your Sofa and Armchair

How To Refresh Sofa Cushions

Compressed Cushion InsertBack cushions on a sofa, or chair, lose their shape and support overtime. It’s a common problem especially on older furniture. The loose fill inserts compress, shift and get lumpy causing the covers to sag.  Sound familiar?

Fortunately, there is a quick, inexpensive fix. Here’s how I refresh back cushions to make them look and function new again:

Cushion Insert with BaffleStep 1:  Remove insert from cushion. Rip out seam at one end. When you open the insert you will see one or two baffles. A baffle is a divider that creates compartments for the loose fill. There is no foam piece in this type of back cushion.

Filling Sofa Cushion With New Fill

Step 2:  Using polyester cluster fiber fill, stuff each compartment (on both sides of the baffle). The amount of fill will depend on the cushion size, level of compression and desired firmness. Example: for the 3 back cushions shown in the photo above I used a total of 4.5 pounds, which created fairly firm cushions.

The poly cluster fill mixes well with other types of poly fill and feathers. It’s light and springy. I like it much better than poly batting.

You don’t have to remove the old fill.  Just add the new fill to the hollow areas. Make sure to stuff the fill into corners — that’s where most of the compression occurs.

Step 3:  Close insert by hand stitching along original seam line. Now it’s ready to slip it into the cover.

TIP: The insert shell is cut larger than your cushion cover on purpose. Don’t pack in the fill too tight. When you’ve added your desired amount of fill the insert should feel fluffy, slightly dense and pliable.  If your insert won’t fit back into your cushion cover you’ve over stuffed it and will need to remove the excess.

Slipcover Zipper: Quick Tip for Making it Look Invisible

Slipcover with Zipper OpeningI almost always put a zipper opening in my custom slipcovers for easy on and off.

For most styles, I insert the zipper in the left back corner. My customers don’t know it’s there until I point it out.

You might think it’s an invisible zipper. It’s not. It’s just a regular #3 nylon coil type and I sew it in much like you would a lap zipper.

But the trick to making it look invisible is how you close it. Here’s how:

Slipcover Zipper Opening

Closing Slipcover Zipper

Hiding Zipper in Slipcover